Puppy Recall with Whistle

Advertisements

Dogs Love the Training Clicker

I enjoy solving puzzles and earning rewards, so combining the two where I earn a reward for solving a puzzle is a big motivator for me. From a dog’s perspective, learning to sit on cue is the same as me solving a puzzle and getting a reward.

At times our praise while training, our “Good Boys,” lack enthusiasm and sincerity and come out sounding more like repetitive burping than genuine praise for a task completed well. The training clicker takes these same repetitive and monotonous qualities and uses them to full advantage.dog training beaverton oregon 2The sound of the click means a treat is on its way and Fluffy learns this association very quickly. If you’re tired and grumpy, the clicker isn’t. The click always sounds the same and always signifies a treat. The worse that can happen is that your timing might be off and you might teach Fluffy to squat instead of sit by clicking too soon.

Regularly I see dogs’ faces light up at the sound of the training clicker and it’s not just because of the treats it signifies, but because it also means spending quality one on one time, not simply training but playing to what amounts to a game. It’s puzzle solving time, rewarded with treats.

Update: Dog-centric Review of the Honda Element

As the front tires wore down on my Honda Element, they were slipping more and more, especially in the rain. I recently replaced them and it’s a huge improvement. They still slip a little when starting in the rain, but they don’t break free and spin like they were doing.

I installed a free flow cold air intake and filter to replace the stock air box and filter. I initially gained an extra 20-25 miles on a tank of gas before the gas light came on, but it decreased over time and eventually was back to where it was with the stock air box. In the summers though I’ve noticed my gas mileage improving and can only guess that it has to do with the air intake now being placed outside the hot engine compartment.

I replaced the spark plugs a few months back and that improved my gas mileage by about 30 miles on a tank and has remained consistent since. I’d never replaced coil on plugs before, but it turned out to be quite simple and took only 20 minutes from start to finish.

So with the improved traction and gas mileage, I’m even happier with the car. I have stiffer anti-sway bars leaning against the wall in the garage that I plan to install when I find the time in the hope that they will decrease the lean in the turns and the Element will handle a little more precisely. But I haven’t forgotten that it’s still a big box great for carrying dogs.

 

Original Review

When you Google “best car for dogs” the Honda Element is almost always on the list. I bought mine with about 100,000 miles on it and have put another 30,000 on it trouble free, though I need to swap in new brake pads in the rear this afternoon.

I like that it has no carpets for dog fur to work its way in so deep no amount of vacuuming can get it all out. Instead it has a thick vinyl that you can use a mop on. I put in aftermarket rubber mats cut to fit perfectly in the front and back. There isn’t a lot of sound insulation, so road noise can be a problem if the blacktop is chewed up by studded tires, but the extra mats help. The noise bothered me at first, but I’ve acclimated to it and don’t notice it much anymore. I drive a 2006 model, and from what I understand the earlier versions were even louder.

I like the tailgate door in the rear because I can open the upper window section to get something out and still have a barrier there so the dogs don’t get their hopes up too much about getting out, though we all know that anytime we stop the car our dogs get their hopes up.

The backseats fold up and out of the way easily, or can be taken out completely without any fuss. Once they’re out, there’s lots of room, including headroom. In cars with less headroom, dog fur gets imbedded even in the headliner. This isn’t a problem with the Element.

Gas mileage is what you’d expect from pushing a large box around town, maybe 20mpg, and better on the freeway. Speed-wise, it gets the job done. I have the 2WD version, which I bought because it gets slightly better gas mileage than the 4WD version. Don’t know about the AWD version. When first starting out, the front wheels tend to spin, especially if the roads are wet. I’m in Portland, Oregon, so they’re wet a lot. This is a common complaint about the 2WD version, and not caused by worn tires. This is my main performance complaint because it has raised my adrenaline a few times while entering traffic.

The Element has an optional dog package that contains the dog behind the rear seats. I don’t have it, I’ve only seen photos of it. I prefer a crate if I need to contain a dog. Less to chew on. My dog, Fleegle, likes to ride shotgun, until he gets tired, then he stretches out in back and naps. He often goes front to back and back to front since his water bowl is in back. I bring this up because the three cup holders are on the floor between the front seats, exactly in the way of any dog getting in the front or going in the back, which makes them useless for anything but holding tennis balls.

So an aftermarket cup holder is a must. And you’ll need to get more of them than you need because they seem to break pretty easily, as if spilled coffee somehow weakens plastic.

The suicide doors are a compromise. The rear side doors can’t be opened without opening the front door first. If you transport more than one dog in the car at a time, you definitely need to work on your Place-stays because with both doors open, it’s a wide space to body block. Then again, I wouldn’t have been interested in the Element in the first place if it had sliding doors. And with all the doors open, it makes for easy access.

All and all, I’m quite satisfied with the Element. If I did it again, I think I would go with the AWD version which would remedy my main complaint about front tire spin on wet roads.

Dog-centric Review of the Honda Element

When you Google “best car for dogs” the Honda Element is almost always on the list. I bought mine with about 100,000 miles on it and have put another 30,000 on it trouble free, though I need to swap in new brake pads in the rear this afternoon.

I like that it has no carpets for dog fur to work its way in so deep no amount of vacuumingcan get it all out. Instead it has a thick vinyl that you can use a mop on. I put in aftermarket rubber mats cut to fit perfectly in the front and back. There isn’t a lot of sound insulation, so road noise can be a problem if the blacktop is chewed up by studded tires, but the extra mats help. The noise bothered me at first, but I’ve acclimated to it and don’t notice it much anymore. I drive a 2006 model, and from what I understand the earlier versions were even louder.

I like the tailgate door in the rear because I can open the upper window section to get something out and still have a barrier there so the dogs don’t get their hopes up too much about getting out, though we all know that anytime we stop the car our dogs get their hopes up.

The backseats fold up and out of the way easily, or can be taken out completely without any fuss. Once they’re out, there’s lots of room, including headroom. In cars with less headroom, dog fur gets imbedded even in the headliner. This isn’t a problem with the Element.

Gas mileage is what you’d expect from pushing a large box around town, maybe 20mpg, and better on the freeway. Speed-wise, it gets the job done. I have the 2WD version, which I bought because it gets slightly better gas mileage than the 4WD version. Don’t know about the AWD version. When first starting out, the front wheels tend to spin, especially if the roads are wet. I’m in Portland, Oregon, so they’re wet a lot. This is a common complaint about the 2WD version, and not caused by worn tires. This is my main performance complaint because it has raised my adrenaline a few times while entering traffic.

The Element has an optional dog package that contains the dog behind the rear seats. I don’t have it, I’ve only seen photos of it. I prefer a crate if I need to contain a dog. Less to chew on. My dog, Fleegle, likes to ride shotgun, until he gets tired, then he stretches out in back and naps. He often goes front to back and back to front since his water bowl is in back. I bring this up because the three cup holders are on the floor between the front seats, exactly in the way of any dog getting in the front or going in the back, which makes them useless for anything but holding tennis balls.

So an aftermarket cup holder is a must. And you’ll need to get more of them than you need because they seem to break pretty easily, as if spilled coffee somehow weakens plastic.

The suicide doors are a compromise. The rear side doors can’t be opened without opening the front door first. If you transport more than one dog in the car at a time, you definitely need to work on your Place-stays because with both doors open, it’s a wide space to body block. Then again, I wouldn’t have been interested in the Element in the first place if it had sliding doors. And with all the doors open, it makes for easy access.

All and all, I’m quite satisfied with the Element. If I did it again, I think I would go with the AWD version which would remedy my main complaint about front tire spin on wet roads.

Here is the updated review after I made a few improvements to my Element.

Dog training, walking and care for the Portland metro area.

%d bloggers like this: