Tag Archives: clicker training

Dogs Love the Training Clicker

I enjoy solving puzzles and earning rewards, so combining the two where I earn a reward for solving a puzzle is a big motivator for me. From a dog’s perspective, learning to sit on cue is the same as me solving a puzzle and getting a reward.

At times our praise while training, our “Good Boys,” lack enthusiasm and sincerity and come out sounding more like repetitive burping than genuine praise for a task completed well. The training clicker takes these same repetitive and monotonous qualities and uses them to full advantage.dog training beaverton oregon 2The sound of the click means a treat is on its way and Fluffy learns this association very quickly. If you’re tired and grumpy, the clicker isn’t. The click always sounds the same and always signifies a treat. The worse that can happen is that your timing might be off and you might teach Fluffy to squat instead of sit by clicking too soon.

Regularly I see dogs’ faces light up at the sound of the training clicker and it’s not just because of the treats it signifies, but because it also means spending quality one on one time, not simply training but playing to what amounts to a game. It’s puzzle solving time, rewarded with treats.

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“Hey, Rover, fetch me a beer.” – Part Three

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Sadie retrieves the rope with a little help.

Teaching Rover to open the fridge is like giving him the key to Pandora’s Box, it can’t be untaught and you don’t want Rover opening the fridge willy-nilly whenever he feels like a snack. The solution is to show Rover how to open the fridge by pulling on a rope attached to the fridge door. This way if there’s no rope, there’s no snacking on last night’s meatloaf or licking clean the ketchup bottle in the door.

We’re going to use fetching the rope to teach Rover to open the cabinet door by tying the rope to the handle. In the process of fetching the rope, he’ll inadvertently open the cabinet and we’ll reward him for that. Continue reading “Hey, Rover, fetch me a beer.” – Part Three

“Hey, Rover, Fetch me a beer.” – Part Two

Part Two of Teaching Rover to Fetch You a Beer from the Fridge

Link to Part One

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Fleegle gives the lid a sniff.

If you hold something out to a dog, they naturally come closer and sniff it. You’ll use this behavior to teach Rover to close the fridge door.

Step One

Take the lid to a tub of cottage cheese and with the flat surface facing Rover, offer it to him.

Have your clicker ready.

When Rover leans in and sniffs it, click and give him his treat.

Do this about 10 times. Do less if you sense Rover losing interest. You want to stop on a high note. Continue reading “Hey, Rover, Fetch me a beer.” – Part Two

“Hey, Rover, fetch me a beer.” – Part One

Sadie brings the beer.
Sadie brings the beer.

Isn’t it time your four-legged friend earned his keep? On Game Day, let that roving carpet called a dog fetch you a cold one from the fridge while you remain comfortably enthroned in your vinyl recliner in full blast-off position. It’s the next best thing to having a built in cooler in the armrest. Continue reading “Hey, Rover, fetch me a beer.” – Part One